Microsoft’s investment in the developer of ChatGPT may be the smartest $1 billion investment ever made

If ChatGPT realizes its potential, Microsoft may have future-proofed its cloud and browser business forever  

For the past few months, it has looked like Big Tech’s bull run is coming to an end. As interest rates soar, even well-funded tech companies are retreating from risky, expensive moonshots or money-losing projects. But a speculative bet is increasingly looking like excellent value for money: OpenAI just  released AI bot ChatGPT and is in talks to raise $30 billion in capital.

In 2019, Microsoft invested $1 billion in buoyant artificial intelligence research firm OpenAI, co-founded by Y Combinator’s Sam Altman, Elon Musk, and a group of others just over seven years ago. Financial details of the deal weren’t disclosed at the time, but MIT Tech Review reported in 2020 that the $1 billion was split between cash and credit for Azure, Microsoft’s cloud business. In November, OpenAI released an easy-to-use bot, ChatGPT, based on its GPT 3.5 language model trained on Azure. Engineers, academics, entrepreneurs, non-techies, and investors were nearly universal in their hype and praise as ChatGPT proved (up to a point) to be frighteningly intelligent. Even when buggy, ChatGPT is so smart that Google considers the chatbot “Code Red” for its search business.

Now, OpenAI is reportedly in talks to raise more capital at a valuation of nearly $30 billion – up from a current valuation of $20 billion – and is reportedly in talks with the VC led by Peter Thiel -Company Founders Fund. The valuation would be cemented by a takeover bid with the sale of existing shares to investors. The Information reported that the company could integrate ChatGPT with Bing, its struggling Google competitor. The first real threat to Google’s search hegemony in two decades.

https://canadatoday.news/

Microsoft offers strong forecast

Forecast Focuses on Cloud Growth

Microsoft Corp. shares rose in late trading, reversing an earlier decline, after the software giant gave a forecast that reassured investors the company’s Azure cloud-computing business still has potential to drive growth. Earlier, Microsoft had reported quarterly sales that topped $50 billion for the first time and profit that exceeded analysts’ estimates, fueled by cloud, gaming and Windows software. Still, Azure revenue decelerated from recent quarters, sending the stock tumbling more than 5%.

Then, on a conference call, the company forecast the closely watched Azure revenue growth rate would pick up in the fiscal third quarter from the second, excluding the impact of currency fluctuations. The stock rose as much as 3.9%. Despite the earlier concerns, the Azure forecast will be “front and center tomorrow morning,” Dan Ives, an analyst at Wedbush, said. “This will help calm Street tech growth worries.”

Investors on Tuesday initially focused on the 46% increase at the company’s cloud unit, which fell short of the rosiest estimates and lagged behind gains for the two prior periods.

https://finance.yahoo.com/