Huawei officially launches Android alternative HarmonyOS for smartphones

Interoperability to all devices

Huawei’s proprietary HarmonyOS wants to eliminate delays and gaps in user experience when you move from one device onto another by adding interoperability to all devices, regardless of the system that powers them. Two years after Huawei was added to the U.S. entity list that banned the Chinese telecom giant from accessing U.S. technologies, including core chipsets and Android developer services from Google, Huawei’s alternative smartphone operating system was unveiled.

On Wednesday, Huawei officially launched its proprietary operating system HarmonyOS for mobile phones. The firm began building the operating system in 2016 and made it open-source for tablets, electric vehicles and smartwatches last September. Its flagship devices such as Mate 40 could upgrade to HarmonyOS starting Wednesday, with the operating system gradually rolling out on lower-end models in the coming quarters.

HarmonyOS is not meant to replace Android or iOS, Huawei said. Rather, its application is more far-reaching, powering not just phones and tablets but an increasing number of smart devices. To that end, Huawei has been trying to attract hardware and home appliance manufacturers to join its ecosystem. To date, more than 500,000 developers are building applications based on HarmonyOS. It’s unclear whether Google, Facebook and other mainstream apps in the West are working on HarmonyOS versions.

https://sg.news.yahoo.com/

Supreme Court rules in Google’s favor in copyright dispute with Oracle over Android software

At stake: 12,000 lines of code that Google used to build Android that were copied from the Java application programming interface developed by Sun Microsystems

The Supreme Court on Monday sided with Google against Oracle in a long-running copyright dispute over the software used in Android, the mobile operating system. The court’s decision was 6-2. Justice Amy Coney Barrett, who was not yet confirmed by the Senate when the case was argued in October, did not participate in the case.

The case concerned about 12,000 lines of code that Google used to build Android that were copied from the Java application programming interface developed by Sun Microsystems, which Oracle acquired in 2010. It was seen as a landmark dispute over what types of computer code are protected under American copyright law.

Oracle had claimed at points to be owed as much as $9 billion, while Google claimed that its use of the code was covered under the doctrine of fair use and therefore not subject to copyright liability. Android is the most popular mobile operating system in the world.

https://www.cnbc.com/

S&P, Dow surge to record highs after strong jobs report

The U.S. economy added 916,000 jobs in March

U.S. equity markets raced to all-time highs Monday as traders celebrated the stronger-than-expected March jobs report. The Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 372 points, or 1.12%, while the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq Composite advanced 1.44% and 1.67%, respectively. The gains ran both the Dow and the S&P 500 to fresh record highs.

The U.S. economy added 916,000 jobs in March as the service sector continued to see growth amid the reopening of the economy, the Labor Department said Friday. Additionally, the unemployment rate fell to 6%, the lowest since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Markets were closed on Friday in observance of Good Friday.

Looking at stocks, Alphabet Inc.’s Google unit scored a major victory over Oracle Corp. in a copyright dispute after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a lower court’s ruling, finding that the former’s use of the latter’s software code in its Android operating system constituted fair use. The ruling means Google will not have to pay potentially as much as $30 billion in damages, Reuters reported, citing two people with knowledge of the situation.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/