California’s first commercial robotaxi

The San Francisco company is owned by General Motors

State officials green-flagged the launch of a fare-based ride-hailing business featuring cars with no human driver at the wheel. Robot-operated Chevy Bolt EVs will be rolled out over the next few weeks by autonomous vehicle maker Cruise. The San Francisco company, owned by General Motors, wouldn’t say how many.

With a permit from the California Public Utilities Commission, Cruise becomes the first commercial robotaxi business in the state and the second in the U.S. The first was launched in 2020 by Alphabet-owned Waymo in Chandler, Ariz. Although driverless cars have been prowling San Francisco streets for years, to date they’ve either been staffed with human safety drivers or, if fully driverless, occupied by company employees.

Potential customers of the new service can download an app for the service, the company said, but may not be approved for a while until the number of Cruise robotaxis deployed in San Francisco increases. Fares will be similar to what ride-hailing companies charge, the company said.

https://www.latimes.com/

S&P, Dow surge to record highs after strong jobs report

The U.S. economy added 916,000 jobs in March

U.S. equity markets raced to all-time highs Monday as traders celebrated the stronger-than-expected March jobs report. The Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed 372 points, or 1.12%, while the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq Composite advanced 1.44% and 1.67%, respectively. The gains ran both the Dow and the S&P 500 to fresh record highs.

The U.S. economy added 916,000 jobs in March as the service sector continued to see growth amid the reopening of the economy, the Labor Department said Friday. Additionally, the unemployment rate fell to 6%, the lowest since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Markets were closed on Friday in observance of Good Friday.

Looking at stocks, Alphabet Inc.’s Google unit scored a major victory over Oracle Corp. in a copyright dispute after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned a lower court’s ruling, finding that the former’s use of the latter’s software code in its Android operating system constituted fair use. The ruling means Google will not have to pay potentially as much as $30 billion in damages, Reuters reported, citing two people with knowledge of the situation.

https://www.foxbusiness.com/