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European Union rejects Theresa May BREXIT plan

The EU tells Theresa May  Chequers Brexit plan ‘will not work’

Theresa May was left fighting to save her Chequers Brexit plan and with it her authority as prime minister after she was ambushed at the end of the Salzburg summit when EU leaders unexpectedly declared that her proposals would not work.

On Thursday night the transport secretary, Chris Grayling, hit back for the government, declaring there were no changes to the Chequers plan on the table and the EU’s demands on Northern Ireland were “impossible” for the UK to accept. “The PM has set out red lines that this country is not going to stay in the single market, we’re not going to stay in the customs union – I agree with her on those, that’s the government’s position,” Grayling said.

The prime minister was thrown on to the defensive – just over a week before the Conservative party conference – when EU leaders led by Donald Tusk and Emmanuel Macron rejected her Chequers plan as it stood, prompting hard Brexit Conservatives to demand it be abandoned.

http://www.theguardian.com

Boris Johnson says May’s Brexit plan ‘worse than status quo’

Tory Brexiteers have attacked Theresa May’s Brexit plan

Boris Johnson and other leading Tory Brexiteers have attacked Theresa May’s Brexit plan at an event putting the economic case for leaving the EU without an agreement on trade. The Economists For Free Trade report said the UK had “nothing to fear” from a “clean break” from the EU and using World Trade Organisation rules. This could give an £80bn boost to the tax base and cut prices by 8%, it said. But the claims were branded “Project Fantasy” by Labour MP Chuka Umunna. And Chancellor Philip Hammond said the economic assumptions behind the analysis were “not sustainable” and out of line with other forecasts.

Mr Hammond, who earlier on Tuesday announced Bank of England Governor Mark Carney would be extending his contract until January 2020 to provide continuity after Brexit, has issued a fresh warning of “some turbulence” if the UK left the EU in March without a deal.

No-deal Brexit could see hospitals run out of medicine

Status of EU workers at risk

Hospitals will be in danger of drug shortages in the event of a no-deal Brexit, NHS trusts have warned privately. Poorly coordinated ministers and health service bosses have failed to properly prepare for the possibility of the UK crashing out of the European Union, according to a leaked letter fromNHS Providers, which represents the trusts. “Public health and disease control coordination could suffer,” said the organisation’s chief executive Chris Hopson, who warned a hard Brexit or no deal could negatively impact upon “the entire supply chain of pharmaceuticals”.

Brexit could also jeopardise the status of EU workers ”on which the NHS relies”, he added.

https://www.independant.co.uk

Greece emerges from eurozone bailout programme

Greece is now free to borrow money on the financial markets

Greece has successfully completed a three-year eurozone bailout programme designed to help it cope with the fallout from its debt crisis. For the first time in eight years, Greece is now free to borrow money on the financial markets. As a condition of the loans, the Greek government was forced to introduce a series of unpopular austerity measures.
The Greek economy has grown slowly in recent years but is still 25% smaller than when the crisis began. Together with assistance from International Monetary Fund (IMF), the loans given to Greece since 2010 amounted to more than €260bn – the biggest bailout in global financial history. The European Stability Mechanism (ESM) provided the country with €61.9bn (£55bn; $70.8bn) over the three years.

https://www.bbc.com

Why Turkey’s currency is plunging

Turkey’s currency and stock market kept on falling

Turkey’s currency and stock market kept on falling Monday, weighed down by investor fears about the country’s economic policies and worsening relations with the United States. The lira fell as low as 6.89 to the dollar Monday, down about 7 percent on the day and 45 percent since the start of the year. The main stock index fell 3.5 percent.

Why is Turkey currency so weak? One reason is that cheap borrowing rates in major economies like the U.S. are rising, attracting investors’ money away from emerging economies like Turkey. Ultra-low interest rates in the U.S. and Europe had for years encouraged companies in Turkey to borrow in foreign currencies. That helped the economy, which booked 7 percent growth last year. But now the U.S. Federal Reserve is raising rates. That draws capital away from Turkey, weakening the currency. And it makes it more expensive for Turkish companies to repay the foreign currency debts, raising economic concerns that can further weaken the currency.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/

The UK would vote to stay in the European Union by 53% to 47% if asked again.

45% of people support a People’s Vote on the final deal, while 34% do not

UK voters would back remaining in the European Union by 53% to 47% if a referendum was held now, according to a comprehensive new poll published today.

A YouGov survey for the ‘pro-remain People’s Vote campaign’ found that 45% want a say on the outcome of the Brexit negotiations with 34% opposed.

Exactly half of respondents said the final decision over whether to leave the EU without a deal should be taken by the public in a second referendum, while a quarter said the British parliament should decide.

Opponents of the UK’s exit from the bloc said the YouGov study of more than 10,000 adults showed public opinion was shifting.

https://www.rte.ie/

Why gold is plunging

Gold is supposed to be a haven

Why has the price fallen lately? Simply put, it’s the strong US dollar.

Expectations for more interest rate hikes by the Federal Reserve have helped lift the value of the currency.

A stronger dollar often is a bad thing for gold because it makes the metal more expensive for international investors.

http://www.cnn.com

Turkey could be the next emerging market to fall into crisis

The Turkish lira has now lost 27% of its value this year

Economists had been expecting the bank to hike rates to fight inflation, which topped 15% in June. Many observers said the unorthodox decision showed that President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who supports lower interest rates, has increased his influence over the central bank.

http://www.cnn.com

Trump, EU agree to work on lowering tariffs

Averting a potential trade war

President Donald Trump on Wednesday said the United States and the European Union had launched a “new phase” in their relationship, saying that the two major economies would start negotiations immediately on a number of areas that include working toward “zero tariffs” on industrial goods, and further cooperation on energy issues.
“We agreed today, first of all, to work together towards zero tariffs, zero non-tariff barriers and zero subsidies for the non-auto industrial goods,” Trump said at a joint press conference in the White House Rose Garden with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker.

Trump did not address whether the two leaders had reached an agreement on car tariffs, though Juncker said that no new tariffs would be assessed as negotiations proceed. Economists have said that, among the major issues under discussion, tariffs on cars could be the biggest threat to the U.S. economy.

http://www.cnbc.com

The City of London just suffered a major defeat from the EU over plans for Brexit

Major blow to the UK’s financial services sector

The European Union late last week dealt a major blow to the UK’s financial services sector in the lead up to Brexit, after negotiators rejected the plans for the sector laid out by the British government in Prime Minister Theresa May’s controversial white paper. According to a report from the Financial Times, the EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier, last Friday told EU ministers that the financial services elements of May’s Brexit plans could not be accepted as they threatened to rob the bloc’s “decision-making autonomy” when it comes to finance.

The UK, earlier in July, proposed a new relationship between the highly interconnected financial services sectors of the UK and the EU that would involve a system of so-called “equivalence.” Under the plans in the white paper, the government said i t will seek to improve on existing requirements for equivalence of rules between the EU and outside countries.

Equivalence is a framework whereby the EU acknowledges that the legal, regulatory and supervisory regime of a non-EU country is as good as its own, and therefore allows that state access to the financial services sector within the bloc. Countries like Singapore and the USA already use a similar system to trade financial services with the EU.

http://www.businessinsider.com

BREXIT: Prepare for the worst

Brussels and Westminster run out of time

Even with the current heatwave and hosepipe ban, there is a chill in the air when it comes to Brexit. Repeat after me in a gravelly, Northern accent: “Winter is coming.” Britain is sweating under the pressure of a loud ticking countdown, and the EU is nervously glancing at its watch, looking away, and then frantically checking the time once again. Project Fear is becoming Project Reality as both Brussels and Westminster run out of time. Since Theresa May triggered Article 50 in March 29 last year, formally notifying the EU of Britain’s exit, the prime minister started a two-year process. In just two years, Britain would have to negotiate both its divorce and future relationship with the bloc.

In many ways, the British government has only got the ball rolling, producing its starting position on trade post-Brexit. And even then, it caused cabinet disarray, resulting in resignations from ministers including Brexit secretary David Davis and foreign secretary Boris Johnson. As time runs out, there are those who bracing themselves for the worst case scenario. Britain will leave the EU on March 29, 2019 (and with a transition period until December 31, 2020), but they could be doing so without completing a deal with the bloc.

Japan/EU trade agreement, ignoring Trump

The deal eliminates nearly all tariffs

The European Union and Japan are signing a widespread trade deal that will eliminate nearly all tariffs, seemingly defying the worries about trade tensions set off by President Donald Trump’s policies. The signing in Tokyo on Tuesday for the deal, largely reached late last year, is ceremonial. It was delayed from earlier this month because Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe cancelled going to Brussels over a disaster in southwestern Japan, caused by extremely heavy rainfall. More than 200 people died from flooding and landslides.

European Council President Donald Tusk and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, who arrived Monday, will also attend a gala dinner at the prime minister’s official residence.

BREXIT: May warns rebels

Back me or risk ‘no Brexit at all

British Prime Minister Theresa May warned her divided party on Sunday that there may be “no Brexit at all” if they wrecked her plan to forge a close relationship with the European Union after leaving the world’s biggest trading bloc.

“My message to the country this weekend is simple: we need to keep our eyes on the prize,” May wrote on Facebook. “If we don’t, we risk ending up with no Brexit at all.”

Linking the fate of Brexit to her own survival in such an explicit way indicates just how precarious May’s position remains after her government was thrust into crisis and U.S. President Donald Trump publicly criticised her Brexit strategy.

Trump Says May’s Brexit Plan Likely to Kill Off U.S. Trade Deal

U.S. president backs Boris Johnson as future prime minister

President Donald Trump dealt a double blow to U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May, saying her plans for a soft Brexit would likely end hopes of a trade deal with the U.S. and that Boris Johnson, who quit her cabinet this week, would be a “great” leader.  “If they do a deal like that, we would be dealing with the European Union instead of dealing with the U.K., so it will probably kill the deal,” Trump said in an interview in the Sun newspaper to be published Friday.

His comments in the Sun, controlled by Rupert Murdoch, a political ally of the president, appeared after May had hosted Trump at a black-tie dinner at Blenheim Palace, the birthplace of Winston Churchill.

Brexit secretary David Davis resigns

Government into crisis

David Davis has resigned as Brexit secretary, shattering the hard-won consensus around Theresa May’s Chequers deal and plunging her government into crisis.

His resignation was swiftly followed by that of fellow Department for Exiting the EU ministers Steve Baker and Suella Braverman. It forces May to reshuffle her government, at the same time as trying to convince backbenchers to support her plan.

Davis sent a bluntly worded resignation letter to Theresa May, saying he would not be a “reluctant conscript” to the plan agreed at Chequers, which he said was “certainly not returning control of our laws in any real sense”.

https://www.the guardian.com/