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THE STOCK TO BUY

 



Everyday PremierCity publishes its choice picking one sole security to buy or to sell. The decision results from the consensus made of the aggregation of multiple choices added from the 100 most important editing financial reviews.

Today the selected stock is ****



Amazon Could Open Up to 3,000 Cashierless Stores by 2021

Shoppers use a smartphone app to enter the store

Amazon.com Inc. is considering a plan to open as many as 3,000 new AmazonGo cashierless stores in the next few years, according to people familiar with matter, an aggressive and costly expansion that would threaten convenience chains like 7-Eleven Inc., quick-service sandwich shops like Subway and Panera Bread, and mom-and-pop pizzerias and taco trucks.

Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos sees eliminating meal-time logjams in busy cities as the best way for Amazon to reinvent the brick-and-mortar shopping experience, where most spending still occurs. But he’s still experimenting with the best format: a convenience store that sells fresh prepared foods as well as a limited grocery selection similar to 7-Eleven franchises, or a place to simply pick up a quick bite to eat for people in a rush, similar to the U.K.-based chain Pret a Manger, one of the people said.

An Amazon spokeswoman declined to comment. The company unveiled its first cashierless store near its headquarters in Seattle in 2016 and has since announced two additional sites in Seattle and one in Chicago. Two of the new stores offer only a limited selection of salads, sandwiches and snacks, showing that Amazon is experimenting with the concept simply as a meal-on-the-run option. Two other stores, including the original AmazonGo, also have a small selection of groceries, making it more akin to a convenience store.

Shoppers use a smartphone app to enter the store. Once they scan their phones at a turnstile, they can grab what they want from a range of salads, sandwiches, drinks and snacks — and then walk out without stopping at a cash register. Sensors and computer-vision technology detect what shoppers take and bills them automatically, eliminating checkout lines.

http://www.bloomberg.com

‘Economy looks like 1937’ says Hedge Fund legend Ray Dalio

A downturn is coming in about two years

Ray Dalio is the founder and co-chief investment officer of Bridgewater Associates, the largest hedge fund in the world. Dalio is sharing his template for understanding debt crises which he says helped him and his fund foresee and navigate the financial crisis. He sat down with Business Insider CEO Henry Blodget to discuss this new book and his outlook for the economy. Follwoing is a transcript of the video.

Saudi Arabia invests $1 billion in electric carmaker Lucid Motors

A serious rival to Tesla

Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund (PIF) has agreed to invest more than $1 billion in Lucid Motors, adding to the emerging competition facing U.S. electric vehicle maker Tesla Inc. The funding will enable Silicon Valley-based Lucid to achieve the commercial launch of its Lucid Air electric vehicle in 2020, PIF said in an announcement on Monday. Lucid joins Daimler-owned  Mercedes, BMW and Volkswagen’s  Audi and Porsche divisions in the battle for dominance in the market for premium battery cars.

In August, Tesla founder Elon Musk said the Saudi sovereign wealth fund could help him to take his company private. The Lucid investment, which PIF said is more than $1 billion but did not give an exact figure, is also part of Saudi Arabia’s plan to build an environmentally friendly economy, to diversify the kingdom away from reliance on crude oil.

5G home internet service starting October 1st

Starting Houston, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, and Sacramento

Verizon’s 5G broadband internet service will go live later this fall, with installations starting on October 1st in Houston, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, and Sacramento, the company announced today. This marks the first 5G commercial service to launch in the US, and it seesVerizon make good on its promise to do so in November 2017. Verizon is calling it simply 5G Home, quoting “typical speeds” of 300 Mbps and peak speeds of nearly 1 Gbps, depending upon location.

This isn’t true mobile 5G, which will be the more impactful rollout of the new internet speed standard that was finalized last December when all networks and phone manufacturers support it. But theoretically, it should bring faster broadband speeds for home internet that are on par with, or at least in the range of, gigabit fiber networks. It also helps Verizon in its rollout of mobile 5G in the future, which will involve a dizzying number of different technologies, hardware, and partnerships to get off the ground.

Bernanke, Paulson and Geithner discuss the 2008 financial crisis

The three bailed out Wall Street to help Main Street

Former Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson and New York Fed President Timothy Geithner reflected on the financial crisis during a forum in Washington, D.C. A decade later, the three officials who helped pull the U.S. out of the financial crisis now struggle with the choices they made, particularly considering that the public still sees the moves as a bailout for Wall Street.

The three spoke during a forum at the Brookings Institution in a talk moderated by CNBC’s Andrew Ross Sorkin, who wrote “Too Big to Fail,” a chronicle of the crisis told from the inside of those who experienced it first-hand.

“We stepped in before the banks had collapsed and we did some things to fix the financial system which are very hard to explain because they are objectionable things,” Paulson said. “In the United States of America there’s a fundamental sense of fairness that the American people have. … You don’t want to reward the arsonist.”

Lehman Brothers went bust 10 years ago

Can it happen again?

In early 2007, the then chairman of the Federal Reserve, Ben Bernanke, dismissed the idea that the slowdown in the US housing market had profound implications. It was, according to the man running the world’s most powerful central bank, just a local affair. Everybody knows what happened next. Within 18 months the local problem in the US subprime mortgage market had ballooned into the biggest global financial crisis since the 1930s. When Lehman Brothers went bankrupt 10 years ago this week, it was the catalyst for a month of turmoil in which no financial institution was considered entirely safe.

Inevitably, the anniversary of those tumultuous weeks in late September and early October 2008 has prompted speculation about whether it could happen again. And, if so, what will be the cause? Looking around the global economy, there are plenty of potential candidates…

Growing the 5G ecosystem

Verizon expands 5G Labs to new locations

Building on the success of its 4G LTE Innovation Centers and its first 5G incubator in New York City at Alley, a membership community for entrepreneurs, Verizon is expanding the program to new locations on the East and West Coasts. Working with a new array of innovators across a variety of verticals, Verizon will further accelerate the development of tomorrow’s 5G use cases and experiences while bringing all the locations under a new brand identity that reflects Verizon’s vision for 5G development.

Verizon’s new 5G Labs – to be located in Washington DC, Palo Alto CA, Waltham MA, and Los Angeles CA – will explore the boundaries of 5G technology, co-create new use applications and hardware, and engage with the community through programming designed to encourage local innovators to rethink what’s possible in a 5G world. The Labs will all be open by the end of 2018. Each Lab will be outfitted with live 5G networks, giving local startups, universities, and technology companies the opportunity to develop, test and refine tomorrow’s 5G solutions.

Stiglitz: US has a major monopoly problem

Economy dominated by large corporations has failed the many and enriched the few

The Nobel Prize winner argues that an economy dominated by large corporations has failed the many and enriched the few. There is much to be concerned about in America today: a growing political and economic divide, slowing growth, decreasing life expectancy, an epidemic of diseases of despair. The unhappiness that is apparent has taken an ugly turn, with an increase in protectionism and nativism. Trump’s diagnosis, which blames outsiders, is wrong, as are the prescriptions that follow. But we have to ask: Is there an underlying problem that can and must be addressed?

There is a widespread sense of powerlessness, both in our economic and political life. We seem no longer to control our own destinies. If we don’t like our Internet company or our cable TV, we either have no place to turn, or the alternative is no better. Monopoly corporations are the primary reason that drug prices in the United States are higher than anywhere else in the world. Whether we like it or not, a company like Equifax can gather data about us, and then blithely take insufficient cybersecurity measures, exposing half the country to the risk of identity fraud, and then charge us for but a partial restoration of the security that we had before a major breach.

U.S. lawmakers grill Facebook, Twitter executives

Technology stocks fall

The Nasdaq fell more than 1 percent on Wednesday, dented by technology stocks after Facebook Inc (FB.O) and Twitter Inc (TWTR.N) executives defended their companies before skeptical U.S. lawmakers. Adding to pressure on technology stocks, the Justice Department later said it would meet with state attorneys general to discuss worries that social media platforms were “intentionally stifling the free exchange of ideas.” Facebook and Twitter were not specifically named.

Twitter shares dropped 6.1 percent. Facebook shares fell 2.3 percent, contributing heavily to both the Nasdaq’s and the S&P 500’s declines. The Dow, however, eked out a slight gain.

Bernie Sanders wants to slap a special tax on Amazon

“Wages are so low, employees forced to depend on food stamps”

Senator Bernie Sanders wants to slap a special tax on Amazon and other big companies that employ workers who collect food stamps and other public assistance. But Amazon disputes Sanders’ depiction, saying its pay and benefits are competitive with other retailers. The progressive icon from Vermont has been on the attack lately, posting a series of Facebook videos over the past week calling out Amazon (AMZN) and Walmart (WMT) for not paying a living wage, which he lists in some posts as $15 an hour. In one video, titled “Get Amazon Off of Corporate Welfare,” he highlighted that CEO Jeff Bezos is the world’s richest person and earns $260 million a day, while many of his workers are on food stamps.

“Mr. Bezos continues to pay many thousands of his Amazon employees wages that are so low that they are forced to depend on taxpayer-funded programs, such as food stamps, Medicaid and subsidized housing in order to survive,” Sanders said in the video, stressing that taxpayers foot the bill for these benefits. “Frankly, I don’t believe that ordinary Americans should be subsidizing the wealthiest people in the world because they pay their employees inadequate wages.”
http://www.cnn.com

Apple’s next big product

Smart glasses

Apple said earlier this week that it bought a small Colorado company that worked on lenses for augmented reality glasses.It’s pretty clear at this point that Apple is working on a pair of its own smartglasses. Of course Apple is working on new products in its $5 billion headquarters and research labs.

The company wouldn’t be as successful as it is if Apple CEO Tim Cook and his executive team weren’t constantly planning for three and five years into the future and asking themselves what computers could look like. It seems like the company has decided it will launch a pair of smartglasses that can impose digital information onto the real world through its advanced lenses.

http://www.businessinsider.com

Pollution in the city lowers education level by one year

The maths and verbal skills are at risk

Chronic exposure to air pollution can cause harm to cognitive performance, a new study reveals. Researchers believe that the negative impact increases with age, and affects men with less education the worst. Over four years, the maths and verbal skills of some 20,000 people in China were monitored by the US-Chinese study.  Scientists believe the results have global relevance, with more than 80% of the world’s urban population breathing unsafe levels of air pollution.

The study was based on measurements of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and particulates smaller than 10 micrometres in diameter where participants lived. It is not clear how much each of these three pollutants is to blame. Carbon monoxide, ozone and larger particulates were not included in the study. Described as an invisible killer, air pollution causes an estimated seven million premature deaths a year worldwide, according to the World Health Organization.

http://www.nanocomputer.com

New NAFTA agreement possible

Canada and U.S. Express Optimism

The United States and Canada are aiming to reach a deal by the end of the week that keeps the three-country North American Free Trade Agreement intact, as President Trump and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau of Canada expressed optimism that the two countries could resolve their differences.

“I think Canada very much wants to make a deal,” Mr. Trump said from the Oval Office on Wednesday, sounding far more optimistic than just days before, when he announced a deal with Mexico and threatened to leave Canada behind.

http://www.nytimes.com

Trump warns Google, Facebook and Twitter in row over bias

Google, Facebook, Twitter  had to be “very careful”

US President Donald Trump has warned Google, Twitter and Facebook they are “treading on troubled territory” amid a row over perceived bias. He said they had to be “very careful”, after earlier accusing Google of rigging the search results for the phrase “Trump news”. An aide said the administration was “looking into” the issue of regulation.

Google said its search engine set no political agenda and was not biased towards any political ideology. Speaking to reporters at the White House, Mr Trump said Google had “really taken a lot of advantage of a lot of people, it’s a very serious thing”. Adding the names of Facebook and Twitter, he said: “They better be careful, because you can’t do that to people… we have literally thousands of complaints coming in.”

http://www.bbc.com

Separate U.S.-Mexico trade agreement

Canada may join later

The Trump administration said Monday it had reached a new, 16-year trade deal with Mexico, setting in motion a rapid chain of events that could redraw the world’s largest trade agreement.

The ultimate scope of the deal could hinge on whether Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau decides to join the agreement after months of feuding with President Trump.

White House officials said the agreement, centered largely on manufacturing, would help American workers by making it harder for countries like China to ship cheap products through Mexico and then into the United States. Harmonizing labor and environmental rules would also protect U.S. jobs and salaries, the officials said, by making it less attractive for U.S. companies to move operations to Mexico.

http://www.washingtonpost.com